Windows mobile zlauncher

 

Apple introduced Control Center in iOS 7 as a way to quickly get to the settings, controls, and basic functions most iPhone and iPad users need most of the time. That includes Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Do Not Disturb, and Orientation Lock, Brightness, media scrubber, player controls, and volume, AirDrop and AirPlay, and FlashLight, Timer, Calculator, and Camera. Yet not all of those options, especially the app ones, will be useful for all people, all of the time. So, with iOS 8 , it would be great if Apple made them at least partially customizable.

Of course, the idea of a customizable Control Center isn't new. Everyone's wanted it since almost immediately after they first saw it back in June of 2013. It's the implementation and scope that's tricky to work out.

For example, I almost never use Do Not Disturb but I use Personal Hotspot all the time. I'd love to be able to swap the former out for the latter. What kind of mechanic could that use?

Windows mobile zlauncher

Windows has a bevy of great app launchers available, and they can do a heck of a lot more than just launch apps (despite the name). When it comes to simplicity and customization, Launchy is our favorite.

Launchy is powerful, while remaining very simple to use. Just hit Alt+Space on your keyboard to bring it up and type the name of the program you want. It will find the closest match, meaning keywords are easy to use (e.g., typing ffx brings up Firefox). It also has a lot of configuration options for tweaking how the program looks and acts, as well as lots of skins and plugins that bring a ton of other functionality to the program.

Launchy, while powerful, is not the most powerful program of its type. Programs like Executor have many more options, but may have some other glaring fault. Launchy provides the perfect balance between usability and features, without any glaring oversights that make it a pain to use. That said, it still can do quite a bit, especially with its plugins (though some may be a tad difficult to set up, depending on how advanced you want to make your commands).

Apple introduced Control Center in iOS 7 as a way to quickly get to the settings, controls, and basic functions most iPhone and iPad users need most of the time. That includes Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Do Not Disturb, and Orientation Lock, Brightness, media scrubber, player controls, and volume, AirDrop and AirPlay, and FlashLight, Timer, Calculator, and Camera. Yet not all of those options, especially the app ones, will be useful for all people, all of the time. So, with iOS 8 , it would be great if Apple made them at least partially customizable.

Of course, the idea of a customizable Control Center isn't new. Everyone's wanted it since almost immediately after they first saw it back in June of 2013. It's the implementation and scope that's tricky to work out.

For example, I almost never use Do Not Disturb but I use Personal Hotspot all the time. I'd love to be able to swap the former out for the latter. What kind of mechanic could that use?

You can use Shell Launcher to replace the default Windows 10 shell with a custom shell. You can use any application or executable as your custom shell, such as a command window or a custom dedicated application.

Warning
You may specify any executable file to be the default shell except C:\Windows\System32\Eshell.exe. Using Eshell.exe as the default shell will result in a blank screen after user signs in.

Shell Launcher processes the Run and RunOnce registry keys before starting the custom shell, so your custom shell doesn’t need to handle the automatic startup of other applications and services.

The journey from Windows 8 to Windows 10 has been anything but smooth, and there have been a lot of questions raised by longstanding Windows Phone fans about the future of Microsoft’s mobile aspirations because up to now, well, things haven’t been great – the global mobile space is still very much the Apple and Google Show it was back in 2012. 

But Microsoft has one last, grand plan up its sleeve, something it sort of started with Windows 8: a unified platform for all devices. This is a huge, potentially game-changing approach to mobile, desktop, PC and hybrid… but it has to be done right and, even more importantly, consumers have to know what the hell is going on. 

Microsoft is well known for its inability to communicate precisely why a consumer should buy and use its products. Next to Google, Samsung and Apple, Microsoft’s marketing department has A LOT to learn in the coming years. Just look at those recent Cortana adverts, for example, which were so bad it would have left David Brent cringing.