Samsung laptop stolen

 

Criminals steal your PC, your laptop, your smartphone – by burglarizing your house or by snatching them from you. Then what happens?

The problem with the everyday is complacency. The majority of us have smartphones and we don’t think twice about grabbing them from our pockets to answer a text. This makes us targets. One technique commonly takes place at bus stops. You get your phone out, and a thief takes you by surprise by simply slapping it out of your hand and running. They immediately catch you on the back foot.

Even a second-hand laptop can get $50, $150, maybe $300. It obviously all depends on the model. A quick look on eBay and you’ll find bids reaching around $700 for particular makes. Many of these will just be innocent enough transactions, but it does show the cash criminals can get for used devices.

Samsung laptop stolen

The drawback is that it takes a while for commands issued through LoJack to take effect; we waited almost 12 hours for a lock command to come good, and several hours passed between us issuing a remote wipe command and the erasure of documents beginning. It’s an acceptable delay as long as the person with your laptop doesn’t immediately begin trawling your Documents folder for data. The company also claims that commands issued happen faster once the software has been running for a few days – we treated our test machine as lost immediately.

For those more keen on recovering their hardware than deleting the data on it and giving it up as lost, there are numerous ways to track and trace your kit. Again, iOS devices lead the way, with Find My iPhone (or iPad) included by default. Give the necessary command through www.icloud.com, and your phone or iPad – assuming it has a connection to the net – shares its location with you. It’s fast, free and accurate. Android devices ( covered next page ) require a third-party app, but the effect is the same.

Devices with GPS are arguably at an advantage when it comes to geolocation, but it’s possible to get an accurate location fix on any device with a Wi-Fi chip, thanks to Google’s location API, which means you can also locate laptops and non-GPS equipped devices, such as Wi-Fi-only iPads. Google’s geolocation works by mining the data gathered by its Street View cars, which includes the geographical location of wireless basestations.

Criminals steal your PC, your laptop, your smartphone – by burglarizing your house or by snatching them from you. Then what happens?

The problem with the everyday is complacency. The majority of us have smartphones and we don’t think twice about grabbing them from our pockets to answer a text. This makes us targets. One technique commonly takes place at bus stops. You get your phone out, and a thief takes you by surprise by simply slapping it out of your hand and running. They immediately catch you on the back foot.

Even a second-hand laptop can get $50, $150, maybe $300. It obviously all depends on the model. A quick look on eBay and you’ll find bids reaching around $700 for particular makes. Many of these will just be innocent enough transactions, but it does show the cash criminals can get for used devices.

As the personal computer (PC) became feasible in 1971, the idea of a portable personal computer soon followed. A "personal, portable information manipulator" was imagined by Alan Kay at Xerox PARC in 1968, [5] and described in his 1972 paper as the " Dynabook ". [6] The IBM Special Computer APL Machine Portable (SCAMP) was demonstrated in 1973. This prototype was based on the IBM PALM processor . [7] The IBM 5100 , the first commercially available portable computer, appeared in September 1975, and was based on the SCAMP prototype. [8]

From 1983 onward, several new input techniques were developed and included in laptops, including the touchpad ( Gavilan SC , 1983), the pointing stick (IBM ThinkPad 700, 1992), and handwriting recognition (Linus Write-Top, [16] 1987). Some CPUs, such as the 1990 Intel i386SL , were designed to use minimum power to increase battery life of portable computers and were supported by dynamic power management features such as Intel SpeedStep and AMD PowerNow! in some designs.

Since the introduction of portable computers during late 1970s, their form has changed significantly, spawning a variety of visually and technologically differing subclasses. Except where there is a distinct legal trademark around a term (notably Ultrabook ), there are rarely hard distinctions between these classes and their usage has varied over time and between different sources.