Tracking samsung intensity

 

With the Galaxy S4, Samsung clinches its goal of global smartphone domination. The supercharged Android 4.2 Jelly Bean device may look like a toy compared with the stunning HTC One and the dapper iPhone 5 . But taken together, its blazing quad-core processor, colorful 5-inch HD screen, sharp-shooting 13-megapixel camera, and mile-high stack of software extras make the Galaxy S4 the most powerful superphone anywhere in the world.

What does the Galaxy S4 have? A better question is: what doesn't it have? There's the 1080p screen, zippy processing speeds that are ideal for gaming , and an IR blaster that can control your TV. Then there's the parade of camera tricks that cram action shots into one scene, use both front and back cameras, and film a video in slow-mo. The GS4 can harness your eyeballs to pause video, and it can answer a phone call with the wave of your hand. Unlike the HTC One and the iPhone 5, it also piles on expandable storage space and a removable battery.

It's true: most of the GS4's featurettes aren't essential -- and some aren't even very useful, like the camera's Eraser mode, which I never got to work, a subpar optical reader, and a translation tool that just duplicates what Google Translate already does. While none stands out as a must-have, cannot-possibly-live-without extra, these features do add up to a compelling testament that the Galaxy S4 is more than a step ahead of the pack.

Tracking samsung intensity

- Easy to wear...able (ha)
- Screen is well sized and easy to use
- 4GB onboard storage for local music files
- Can play music to Bluetooth headsets
- Plenty of tools to track more than just workouts
- Automatic tracking of activity and sleep

- Battery life largely varies depending on usage
- Lack of apps in Tizen ecosystem
- Heart rate tracking inaccurate during more intense workouts
- Heart rate monitoring off for all but cardio activities
- Replying to notifications is severely limited
- No alarm despite sleep tracking

The Samsung Gear Fit 2 is a proper evolution of Samsung’s fitness tracker - and, in conjunction, their S Health tracking system. However, it doesn’t do enough to replace more focused trackers that fitness enthusiasts may already wear.

With the Galaxy S4, Samsung clinches its goal of global smartphone domination. The supercharged Android 4.2 Jelly Bean device may look like a toy compared with the stunning HTC One and the dapper iPhone 5 . But taken together, its blazing quad-core processor, colorful 5-inch HD screen, sharp-shooting 13-megapixel camera, and mile-high stack of software extras make the Galaxy S4 the most powerful superphone anywhere in the world.

What does the Galaxy S4 have? A better question is: what doesn't it have? There's the 1080p screen, zippy processing speeds that are ideal for gaming , and an IR blaster that can control your TV. Then there's the parade of camera tricks that cram action shots into one scene, use both front and back cameras, and film a video in slow-mo. The GS4 can harness your eyeballs to pause video, and it can answer a phone call with the wave of your hand. Unlike the HTC One and the iPhone 5, it also piles on expandable storage space and a removable battery.

It's true: most of the GS4's featurettes aren't essential -- and some aren't even very useful, like the camera's Eraser mode, which I never got to work, a subpar optical reader, and a translation tool that just duplicates what Google Translate already does. While none stands out as a must-have, cannot-possibly-live-without extra, these features do add up to a compelling testament that the Galaxy S4 is more than a step ahead of the pack.

I have to give Samsung credit: it went from making a me-too wearable to making something that feels like a serious commitment, something that its intended audience would actually want to use. I’m talking about the Samsung Gear Fit 2, the company’s new activity-tracking wristband.

Samsung’s first try at this kind of “smart” band , which shipped in 2014, launched with flaws; only worked with Samsung’s Galaxy phones; and initially only tracked a few activities — and it cost $200. In contrast, the new $180 Gear Fit 2 wristband works with all phones running newer versions of Android, has built-in GPS, and tracks a boatload of fitness activities — so many that I couldn’t try them all even though I’ve been wearing it for three weeks. This is not your basic step counter.

The intent behind the Gear Fit 2 is clear: Samsung wants to get as many people as it can into its hardware ecosystem, but chunky metal smartwatches generally don’t make great fitness trackers. And if there’s even a sliver of the market that would gravitate toward a Fitbit Surge, or get an Apple Watch — and millions of those people do exist — Samsung wants to make sure it’s there, too.