How can you tell if someone put spyware on your phone

 

FRONTLINE investigates why Wall Street’s leaders have escaped prosecution for any fraud related to the sale of bad mortgages.

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How can you tell if someone put spyware on your phone

When you speak , you use your voice to produce words. The past tense of speak is spoke . The -ed participle is spoken .

Don't use 'speak' to report what someone says. Don't say, for example, ' He spoke that the doctor had arrived '. Say 'He said that the doctor had arrived'.

If someone tells you something, they give you some information. You usually refer to this information by using a that -clause or a wh -clause.

FRONTLINE investigates why Wall Street’s leaders have escaped prosecution for any fraud related to the sale of bad mortgages.

In order to foster a civil and literate discussion that respects all participants, FRONTLINE has the following guidelines for commentary. By submitting comments here, you are consenting to these rules:

Readers' comments that include profanity, obscenity, personal attacks, harassment, or are defamatory, sexist, racist, violate a third party's right to privacy, or are otherwise inappropriate, will be removed. Entries that are unsigned or are "signed" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. We reserve the right to not post comments that are more than 400 words. We will take steps to block users who repeatedly violate our commenting rules, terms of use, or privacy policies. You are fully responsible for your comments.

Will Oremus is Slate ’s senior technology writer. Email him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter .

When I arrive at Facebook’s sprawling, Frank Gehry–designed office in Menlo Park, I’m met by a lanky 37-year-old man whose boyish countenance shifts quickly between an earnest smile and an expression of intense focus. Tom Alison is director of engineering for the news feed; he’s in charge of the humans who are in charge of the algorithm.

Alison steers me through a maze of cubicles and open minikitchens toward a small conference room, where he promises to demystify the Facebook algorithm’s true nature. On the way there, I realize I need to use the bathroom and ask for directions. An involuntary grimace crosses his face before he apologizes, smiles, and says, “I’ll walk you there.” At first I think it’s because he doesn’t want me to get lost. But when I emerge from the bathroom, he’s still standing right outside, and it occurs to me that he’s not allowed to leave me unattended.